3C’s of Communication Part 4. Project Mode = Projecting.

This is not a White Paper! White Papers pretend to be unbiased.

This is an edited copy of a post from May, 2016

by Ted Steinberg, Co-founder

 

The 3 C’s of how everyone communicates are:

  1. The Context of The Communication = where the communicator is coming from. (The recipient picks up on this. We do not need to tell them, nor should we, unless we want to sound ridiculously terrific.)
  2. The Concept of The Communication = the rationale for why we are communicating with them. (We need to tell them why we are doing this, no matter what, unless we have something to hide.)
  3. The Content of The Communication = the stuff, details, features, benefits, opportunity, etc. we are communicating, which we want them to know. (Less is More! The less content the better, and eliminate the self-congratulatory phrases and put the product superlatives in the trash where they belong. Save the plaudits about your company for the recipients to decide upon. Customers like to sell themselves.)

What Takes Place in Project Mode?

Intentional Grounding:

1.     In Project Mode we are Projecting = We are thinking; we are not acting, therefore we are not communicating with customers, unless, rarely, we have some designated customers who have agree to join us in matchmaking what we want to communicate to whom, and how we want to do so. These customers are directly involved as opposed to surveys and other forms of feedback.

2.     In Project Mode, we are not selling. Marketing is the homework, selling is the test! We can avoid our homework, we can never avoid the test. Consequently, in Project Mode, we are doing our homework.

3.     In Project Mode, we are Projecting WHAT we intend to communicate in Production Mode, where are selling. (We are Structuring Deliverable Offerings, whose context, concept, and content will get the attention of customers and keep their attention, because the offerings will be attractive and acknowledging, too.)

4.     In Project Mode, we are Projecting HOW we intend to communicate in Production Mode, where are selling. (All communications, direct or indirect, stated or implied, are sales communications. Thus, marketing material, advertising, websites, etc., and sales presentations are sales communications, whose context, concept, and content will get the attention of customers and keep their attention, because the offerings will be attractive and acknowledging, too.)

5.     In Project Mode, we are Projecting what it is we want to have happen in Production Mode. (We are projecting our results = we are forecasting!)

6.     In Project Mode, our communications are Projecting to the customer: Who we are, What we offer, How we sell, and to Whom. (When we are projecting well, it is easier for the customer to accept, understand, and agree with what is happening, and decide to do business with us. When we are projecting poorly, it is easier for the customer to resist, misunderstand, and disagree with what is happening, and decide not to do business with us.)

What Steps Take Place in Project Mode?

{The purpose of each step is to get us to the next step. Each step becomes the foundation for everything that follows. The value of successive steps depend on the combined value of the preceding steps.]

1.     Preparation = where we are thinking of ways to reach our objective. (Our overall, non-specific, objection, always is: “to Produce & Maximize Valuable Customer Relationships – on purpose, in any selling situation.” (We are always preparing.)

2.     Planning = where we are planning to utilize whichever way makes sense to us, based on doing our homework as to Who, What, and How we can sell. The Who = how many customers might need, want, or demand what we have to offer? These issues deal with the TAM (Total Available Market), and SAM (Served Available Market, based on what we now have for sale and what is is that these customers are buying or not buying from other resources. SAM is always less than TAM. The customers in TAM & SAM are segmented by size, type, interests, and what rationales might exist for why they would like our offerings. Planning includes developing structured and deliverable offering, and the best sales and communication methods. (We are always planning, even when we are promoting)

3.     Promoting = what we have decided to communicate (project = a verb) and by what method = The How. (We are always promoting, even when we are prospecting.)

4.     Prospecting = who do we intend contact, and how do we intend to do so, and what do we intend to use as the mind opener/s which will cause the customers to sell themselves on accepting, understanding, and agreeing that paying attention to our activity is a good idea. (We are always prospecting, even when we are selling, before, during, and after the customer decided to do business with us.)

5.     Selling, part 1 = Beginning the sales event/s. Customers look, listen, touch, smell, and taste (whatever is applicable), and decide to go forward, stay put, or leave, based on who well they accepted, understood, and agreed with what’s happening, in terms with the degree which they may need, want, or demand what we offer and who it is we are. (Warning! Customers may need what you offer, but they may not want you to sell it to them.)

6.     Selling, part 2 = Continuing the sales event/s. [Same issues as above.)

7.     Selling, part 3 = Finishing the sales event/s. (Same issues as above.)

8.     Satisfying the Agreement = they decided to do business with you and they bought something, too. Now, the seller has to satisfy their side of the agreement. So does the buyer.

9.     Maximizing the Relationship = we (the sellers) decide to see what else, and how else, we can serve = with more of the same or different products & services.

Note: This post is a broad-brush description of the nuts and bolts of creating deliverable communications. Future posts deal with how to make sure your sales efforts are congruent (marketing-wise and sales-wise) with your intentions. When your marketing efforts are perfectly annealed with your sales efforts, you can’t tell the difference, and you don’t care.