3C’s of Communication Part 5. Production Mode = Productivity.

 

This is not a White Paper! White Papers pretend to be unbiased.

This is an edited copy of a post from May, 2016

by Ted Steinberg, Co-founder

 

The 3 C’s of how everyone communicates are:

  1. The Context of The Communication = where the communicator is coming from. (The recipient picks up on this. We do not need to tell them, nor should we, unless we want to sound ridiculously terrific.)
  2. The Concept of The Communication = the rationale for why we are communicating with them. (We need to tell them why we are doing this, no matter what, unless we have something to hide.)
  3. The Content of The Communication = the stuff, details, features, benefits, opportunity, etc. we are communicating, which we want them to know. (Less is More! The less content the better, and eliminate the self-congratulatory phrases and put the product superlatives in the trash where they belong. Save the plaudits about your company for the recipients to decide upon. Customers like to sell themselves.)

What Are You Producing In Production Mode?

  1. The Sales Communications you structured in Project Mode – which will:
    1. Project who you are, what you sell, how you sell, and whom you are already doing business.
    2. Get & Keep the Attention of Customers who will want to do business with you.
    3. Get & Keep the Attention of Customers who will want to buy your products and services, too.
  2. The Sales Activities you structured in Project Mode – which will:
    1. Project who you are, what you sell, how you sell, and whom you are already doing business.
    2. Get & Keep the Attention of Customers who will want to do business with you.
    3. et & Keep the Attention of Customers who will want to buy your products and services, too.

All Communications & Activities Breed Acceptance & Resistance, Too!

Even in the best of times, 100% of the recipients won’t Accept what you are doing. Welcome to the sales business!

Even in the worst of times, 100% of the recipients won’t Resist what you are doing. Welcome to the sales business!

·       Making The Sale First breeds more resistance than acceptance. (In this case, you need to make a sale before your prospect becomes a customer. The pressure is on you; when it’s on you it’s on your customer. Who put it there? You did. You’re the one who’s making the communication. Unfortunate communications imply, “we’re great” or “aren’t we great?” Fortunate communications imply, “you’re great.”)

·       Making The Customer First breeds more acceptance than resistance. (in this case, in your mind & in the customer’s mind, the prospect is already a customer. As you know, it’s easier to be with a customer you already are doing business with than a prospect. There’s less tension, unless, unfortunately, your customer is dissatisfied.)

The more emphasis you put on making sales rather than customers, the more resistance you will meet and the more involved the sales conversation will need to be and thus the more expertise will be needed by salespeople. That’s why sales systems that are expertise based never get the job done. They are self fulfilling perpetual motion machines, whereby, the more you time and money you spend on learning the “secrets” of how to get your own way the more you will need to spend. It’s a great money machine for somebody. Is it for the salesperson or is it for the customer or whom?

Oops Galore = What If Your Communications Fail?

Avoiding Mistakes & Fixing Those You Forgot To Avoid:

When you are selling and you make a mistake how will you know?

Is it because you got caught? Or found out? (Probably that’s what happened.)

  1. Mistakes which take place at the level of context are hardest to fix.
  2. Mistakes which take place at the level of concept are harder to fix.
  3. Mistakes which take place at the level of content are easy to fix.

Contextual mistakes are nearly impossible to fix. It’s hard to tell the person you were not operating in a You OR Me Context when you were out to get them.

When you’re focused on making a sale rather than paying attention to the process of making a customer, your mistakes will be harder to correct because the context you created was You OR Me.

If, however you are focused on You AND Me, via good matchmaking, you won’t be as concerned about getting everything right in order to get them to buy.

When you take the pressure off yourself, you take the pressure off your customer. When your customers have the opportunity to sell themselves in a pressure free environment, it’s easier for them to enjoy your communications, activities, and offerings.